runnin-onfaith
Sin comes with enormous consequences. Until we come to the healing embrace of the crucified Savior, sin will take [a] destructive toll upon our lives. If you can understand it, this is what we mean by the wrath of God—that God has given us real being, and real existence, and there are real consequences for our actions.

If you want to understand on a deeper level, you can understand this: We are more punished by our sins, than for our sins.
Brian Zahnd, Death of the Monster God (via hislivingpoetry)
africaninsights
blackmanteach:

Korde Tuttle 
“It’s difficult for me to reflect on my impact as a Black, male educator without honoring the other identifiers that informed my decision to teach. I’m a big brother. I was raised in the American South. I also identify as gay. My blackness and sexuality have provided me with invaluable perspectives on privilege, access, and the necessity for curricular innovation. Having five younger siblings instilled a sense of responsibility within me. And the real and perceived effects of regional stigmatization and allocation of resources has left much to be desired.    

With regard to my impact as a Black, male educator, I honestly don’t feel as though I can answer that question yet. My hope is that by nature of who I am, I inspire my students to dream at the zenith of achievement. I hope that they’re more conscious of the opportunities and obstacles that await them; that cycles of oppression are real, but so are cycles of empowerment. Ultimately, I hope my impact has very little to do with me, and everything to do with my students experimenting with new ideas and behaviors in order to expand their range of response.”

blackmanteach:

Korde Tuttle 

“It’s difficult for me to reflect on my impact as a Black, male educator without honoring the other identifiers that informed my decision to teach. I’m a big brother. I was raised in the American South. I also identify as gay. My blackness and sexuality have provided me with invaluable perspectives on privilege, access, and the necessity for curricular innovation. Having five younger siblings instilled a sense of responsibility within me. And the real and perceived effects of regional stigmatization and allocation of resources has left much to be desired.    

With regard to my impact as a Black, male educator, I honestly don’t feel as though I can answer that question yet. My hope is that by nature of who I am, I inspire my students to dream at the zenith of achievement. I hope that they’re more conscious of the opportunities and obstacles that await them; that cycles of oppression are real, but so are cycles of empowerment. Ultimately, I hope my impact has very little to do with me, and everything to do with my students experimenting with new ideas and behaviors in order to expand their range of response.”

madamepeppersmorsels

angelclark:

99-Year-Old Lady Sews A Dress A Day For Children In Need 

Lillian Weber, a 99-year-old good Samaritan from Iowa, has spent the last few years sewing a dress a day for the Little Dresses For Africa charity, a Christian organization that distributes dresses to children in need in Africa and elsewhere.

Weber’s goal is to make 1,000 dresses by the time she turns 100 on May 6th. So far, she’s made more than 840. Though she says she could make two a day, she only makes one – but each single dress she makes per day is personalized with careful stitchwork. She hopes that each little girl who receives her dress can take pride in her new garment.

sterlinglikesilver

todayinhistory:

August 28th 1955: Emmett Till murdered

On this day in 1955, the 14-year-old African-American boy Emmett Till was murdered in Mississippi. While visiting family in the state, Till allegedly flirted with the young white shopkeeper Carolyn Bryant while buying candy. Bryant told her husband and a few nights later he and his half-brother abducted Till and brutally tortured and murdered him. His mutilated body was found three days later in the Tallahatchie river; Till’s face was unrecognisable, but he was identified by the ring he wore engraved with his father’s initials that his mother gave him before he left for Mississppi. The viciousness of this unprovoked, racially-motivated crime sent shockwaves throughout the nation. The case drew attention to the oppression of African-Americans throughout the nation and provided a name and a face to the threat of lynching. Till’s mother Mamie, a highly educated woman who went on to become a devoted fighter for African-American equality, insisted on an open-casket funeral in order to show the world what was done to her young son. Thousands attended the funeral and thousands more saw the horrific images of Till’s body. Due to the fierce reactions the murder had engendered it was a particularly painful, but sadly expected, outcome when the all-white jury in Mississippi acquitted Till’s killers, despite Till’s great-uncle openly identifying them in court. A few months later the killers, now protected by double jeopardy laws, sold their story to Look magazine and openly confessed to the murder in chilling detail. Taking place a year after the Supreme Court outlawed school segregation in Brown v. Board of Education, the outrage over the murder galvanised the burgeoning Civil Rights Movement. 100 days after Emmett Till’s murder Rosa Parks, on her way back from a rally for Till hosted by the then-unknown Martin Luther King Jr., refused to give up her seat for a white man on an Alabama bus. This sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott, thus beginning the movement that would result in the dismantling of the system of Jim Crow segregation and win successes in promoting African-American social and political equality.

radioteopoli
Life is short. The world is fragile. All of us are vulnerable, but we are here because this is our calling. Our lives are rooted not only in time, but also in eternity, and the life of learning, humbly offered to God, is its own reward. It is one of the appointed approaches to the divine reality and the divine beauty, which we shall hereafter enjoy in heaven, and which we are called to display even now amidst the brokenness all around us.
C.S. Lewis (via faithandfandoms)
thepeoplesrepublicofheaven

jean-luc-gohard:

castiels-weenie:

jean-luc-gohard:

What fucks me up about the Darren Wilson fundraiser is that he hasn’t been charged with a crime. He doesn’t have to hire a lawyer. He’s on paid leave, so he’s not losing wages. This is not covering his expenses, because he…